Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Netherlands

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

One Food frequency, one to five 24 hours recalls

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Adults, elders/Mean=70 ±_10

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=8104 (participants)

Ultra-processed food consumption patterns among older adults in the Netherlands and the role of the food environment

Goal

Describe the patterns of ultra-processed foods (UPFs) consumption in the Netherlands; to test if exposure to the food environment is associated with UPFs consumption; and if this association differed across educational levels and neighbourhood urbanisation.

Results

The study population was aged 70(±_10 SD) years and 80.5% was female. Average UPFs consumption was 17.8% of total food intake in grams and 37% of total energy intake. Those who consumed greater amounts of UPFs had a poorer overall diet quality. Adjusted linear regression models showed that closer proximity and larger availability to any type of food retailer was associated with lower UPFs consumption (both in grams and kilocalories). Somewhat stronger significant associations were found for proximity to restaurants (__=__ 1.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI)_=__ 2.6; _ 0.6), and supermarkets (__=__ 2.2%, 95%CI_=__ 3.3; _ 1.1); i.e., Individuals living within 500 m from the closest supermarket, as compared to 1500 m, had 2.6% less calories from UPFs. No differences were found on analyses stratified for urbanisation and education.

Authors

Pinho MGM, Lakerveld J, Harbers MC, et al.

Journal

Eur J Nutr

DOI