Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Longitudinal

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Italy

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

One food frequency

Study setting

Non specify

Age group of participant

Adults/35+

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n= 22475 (participants)

Ultra-processed food consumption is associated with increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Moli-sani Study/The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Goal

Assess the association between UPF and mortality risk in a large sample of the Italian adult population and test which nutritional factors were on the pathway of this relation. Established risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) were analyzed as potential biological mechanisms linking UPF to mortality.

Results

Individuals reporting the highest intake of UPF (Q4, >14.6% of total food), as opposed to the lowest (Q1, UPF < 6.6%), experienced increased risks of CVD mortality (HR: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.23, 2.03), death from ischemic heart disease (IHD)/cerebrovascular disease (HR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.09), and all-cause mortality (HR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.46). High sugar content explained 36.3% of the relation of UPF with IHD/cerebrovascular mortality, whereas other nutritional factors (e.g., saturated fats) were unlikely to be on the pathway. Biomarkers of renal function accounted for 20.1% of the association of UPF with all-cause mortality, and 12.0% for that of UPF with CVD mortality. Conclusions: A high proportion of UPF in the diet was associated with increased risk of CVD and all-cause mortality, partly through its high dietary content of sugar. Some established biomarkers of CVD risk were likely to be on the pathway of such associations. These findings should serve as an incentive for limiting consumption of UPF, and encouraging natural or minimally processed foods, as several national nutritional policies recommend.

Authors

Marialaura B, Augusto DC, Simona C, et.al.

Journal

DOI