Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Australia

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

One 24 hours recall

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Adults/20+

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=7411(participants)

Ultra-processed food consumption and obesity in the Australian adult population/Nutr. Diabetes 

Goal

Explore the association between ultra-processed food consumption and obesity among the Australian adult population and stratifying by age group, sex and physical activity level.

Results

Significant (P-trend ≤ 0.001) direct dose–response associations between the dietary share of ultra-processed foods and indicators of obesity were found after adjustment. In the multivariable regression analysis, those in the highest quintile of ultra-processed food consumption had significantly higher BMI (0.97 kg/m2 ; 95% CI 0.42, 1.51) and WC (1.92 cm; 95% CI 0.57, 3.27) and higher odds of having obesity (OR = 1.61; 95% CI 1.27, 2.04) and abdominal obesity (OR = 1.38; 95% CI 1.10, 1.72) compared with those in the lowest quintile of consumption. Subgroup analyses showed that the trend towards positive associations for all obesity indicators remained in all age groups, sex and physical activity level. Conclusion: The findings add to the growing evidence that ultra-processed food consumption is associated with obesity and support the potential role of ultra-processed foods in contributing to obesity in Australia.

Authors

Machado PP, Steele EM, Levy RB, et al. 

Journal

DOI