Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

United Kingdom

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

4-day food record

Study setting

Online

Age group of participant

Adults/19-96

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=6143 (participants)

Ultra-processed food consumption and indicators of obesity in the United Kingdom population (2008-2016)

Goal

Examine the association between the consumption of ultra-processed foods and adiposity in a nationally representative sample of the UK adult population.

Results

The highest consumption of ultra-processed food was associated with 1.66 kg/m2 higher BMI (95%CI 0.96–2.36), 3.56 cm greater WC (95%CI 1.79–5.33) and 90% higher odds for being obese (OR = 1.90, 95%CI 1.39–2.61), compared with the lowest consumption. A 10% increase in the consumption of ultra-processed foods was associated with an increase of 0.38 kg/m2 in BMI (95%CI 0.20–0.55), 0.87 cm in WC (95%CI 0.40–1.33) and 18% higher odds of being obese (OR = 1.18, 95%CI 1.08–1.28). The consumption of ultra-processed food was associated with an increase in BMI, WC and prevalence of obesity in both sexes. A dose response relationship was observed in both sexes, with a 10% increase in the consumption of ultra-processed foods being associated with a 18% increase in the prevalence of obesity in men and a 17% increase in women. Higher consumption of ultra-processed food is associated with greater adiposity in the UK adult population.

Authors

Rauber F, Steele EM, Louzada MLC, Millett C, Monteiro CA, Levy RB.

Journal

PLoS ONE

DOI