Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Mixed-Method

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

Other (non-stated)

Country studied

United Kingdom and United of States

Data

Primary

Data Collected

Survey

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Adults/18+

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (students)

Sample size

n=1234 (participants)

The impact of Covid-19 on education and children's services: Food insecurity and lived experience of students

Goal

Provides evidence of the impact of Covid-19 on higher education students’ levels of food security and lived experiences.

Results

The preliminary findings show that nearly 35% of students surveyed reported low or very low levels of food security and 41% of students were worried that their food would run out. We also found high levels of poor mental health and well-being; and mental health was associated with level of food security. The best predictor of the level of food security was students’ living arrangements during the Covid-19 pandemic. Students who were living on their own or with other students were more likely to experience low or very low levels of food insecurity compared to those students living with family members. The financial data collected show that many students relied on employment as their main source of income, and students are very worried about their current financial security. Furthermore, we found a relatively high reliance on ultraprocessed foods as the main food type in students’ diets. The data from open-ended questions lend further support to the quantitative findings reported and provide further insight into students’ lived experiences. Finally, this paper concludes with key recommendations for policy makers, universities and student unions.

Authors

Defeyter M, Stretesky P, Reynolds C. et al

Journal

Ulster University

DOI