Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Experimental

Classification

Other (non-stated)

Country studied

Uruguay

Data

Primary

Data Collected

Other (questionnaire)

Study setting

Online

Age group of participant

Adults/18+

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n= 163(participants)i

Sick, salient and full of salt, sugar and fat: Understanding the impact of nutritional warnings on consumers’ associations through the salience bias

Goal

Explore the effect of the inclusion of nutritional warnings on consumer associations with labels of ultra-processed products.

Results

At T1, when labels were presented without nutritional warnings, responses to the word association task were related to a description of the product category, expected sensory characteristics of the products, brand names, liking and eating occasions. However, when the labels werepresented with the warnings at T2, a significant increase in the frequency of mention of responses was observed within the categories Excessive content of sugar/fat/sodium, Not healthy, Diseases and negative health conditions, Rejection to consume, and Unexpected information. Results from the present work suggest that immediately after their implementation, nutritional warnings cause a salience bias that make excessive nutrient content and its negative health consequences more salient in consumers’ minds, especially in the case of products with a particular health-related connotation.

Authors

Ares G, Antúnez L, Otterbring T, Curutchet MR, et al.

Journal

Food Quality and Preference

DOI