Data

Year of publication

2019

Type

Mixed-Method

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA, Other (International Food Information Council, University of North Carolina at Chape Hill)

Country studied

United Kingdom, Portugal, Ireland, Germany and France

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

Two 24 hours recalls, database, literature

Study setting

Household and laboratory

Age group of participant

Children/6-12

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (children)

Sample size

n=8661 (participants)

Robustness of food processing classification systems.

Goal

Evaluate the robustness of processing classification systems and to assess their utility as a measure of healthfulness in children's diets.

Results

UNC had the highest inter-rater reliability (_ = 0.97), followed by IFIC (_ = 0.78) and Nova (_ = 0.76). Lower potassium was predictive of IFIC’s classification of foods as moderately compared to minimally processed (p = 0.01); lower vitamin D was predictive of UNC’s classification of foods as highly compared to minimally processed (p = 0.04). Sodium and added sugars were predictive of all systems’ classification of highly compared to minimally processed foods (p < 0.05). Current classification systems may not suciently identify foods with high nutrient quality commonly consumed by children in the U.S.

Authors

Bleiweisis-Sande R, Chui K, Evans EW, Goldberg J, Amin S, Sacheck J.

Journal

Nutrients

DOI