Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

N/A

Country studied

Global

Data

Primary

Data Collected

One Food frequency

Study setting

School, household

Age group of participant

Children/10-12

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (children)

Sample size

n=422 (participants)

Parental consumption of ultra-processed, high-fat products has no association with childhood overweight/obesity: An epidemiological study among 10–12-years-old children in Greece

Goal

Examine the association between parental ultra-processed, high-fat products' consumption and childhood overweight/obesity.

Results

The prevalence of obesity in the reference population was 2.9%, whereas the prevalence
of overweight was 19.3%. A strong correlation was observed between children’s and their parents’
BMI status (P < 0.001). Multi-adjusted data analysis revealed no association between parental
intake of ultra-processed, high-fat products and children overweight/obesity. Similarly, when
the data analysis accounted for family income and physical activity status of the children, the
aforementioned results remained insignificant. Despite the fact that parents’ specific dietary habits seem not to affect their children’s weight status, public health programs should consider parental nutrition education and mobilization as a preventive measure for childhood overweight/obesity.

Authors

Kanellopoulou A, Antoniou E, Notara V, et. al.

Journal

Family Practice

DOI