Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

United Kingdom, Portugal, Ireland, Germany and France

Data

Primary

Data Collected

One food record

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Children/2-17

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable

Sample size

n=42 (participants)

P120 children with autism spectrum disorder who are picky eaters may consume more ultra-processed foods than non-picky eaters

Goal

Examine associations between picky eating and food categories by NOVA classifications (unprocessed foods vs ultra-processed foods) among youth with ASD.

Results

Ultra-processed foods accounted for the majority of the children's energy intake (mean 62.6%). Picky eaters had greater percent energy intake from ultra-processed foods (P_=_.004, mean 68.7% vs 48.0%) and lower percent energy intake from unprocessed foods (P_=_.001, mean 23.4% vs 44.7%) compared to non-picky eaters. Among the picky eaters, 5 were also considered as binge eaters, which was associated with greater percent energy intake from ultra-processed foods (P_=_.032, 79.4% vs 60.0%) and lower percent energy intake from unprocessed foods (P_=_.041, 14.8% vs 32.1%) compared to those who were picky eaters but not binge eaters and non-picky eaters combined.

Authors

Buro A, Kakkad A, Gray H.

Journal

Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior

DOI