Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Qualitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, India, Indonesia, Kyrgyzstan, Mexico, Nigeria, the Philippines, Serbia, Sudan, the USA and Zimbabwe.

Data

Primary

Data Collected

One 24 hours recall

Study setting

Not stated

Age group of participant

Teenagers/Mean=15

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (teenagers)

Sample size

n=656 (participants)

Food and Me. How adolescents experience nutrition across the world. A Companion report to the state of the world's children 2019

Goal

Canvas and represent the views of a wide range of adolescents living in 18 countries on their dietary choices, food intake, access to nutritious, safe, affordable and sustainable diets, nutrition literacy, and the influences on and barriers to these. investigate how adolescents’ experiences of surrounding food environments drive their food choice. identify commonalities and points of divergence between the knowledge and experiences of adolescents in different settings.

Results

Adolescent voices from the workshops demonstrate how, sadly, food systems are failing young people. Although adolescents had some awareness of what constituted a ‘good diet’, several factors overrode this, shaping their food choices and compromising their dietary intake. Individual factors such as taste were key drivers of food choices, with many adolescents preferring ‘tasty’, ultra-processed foods. Food systems played a large role, with cost and availability of food options impacting what adolescents ate. Where unhealthy foods were cheaper and readily available these were often chosen over healthier options that could be more expensive, harder to find or more difficult to prepare. Along with these issues raised, adolescents provided concrete suggestions for changes in nutrition policies and practices, from food systems to investments in nutrition, leading to sustainable improvements in adolescents' health and well-being across the globe. By positioning adolescents as active partners in future work, we can break intergenerational cycles of poor nutrition and achieve sustainable change in adolescents' health and well-being across the globe.

Authors

Fleming CA, De Oliveira JD, Hockey K, et. al.

Journal

Western Sydney University

DOI