Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

France

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

Three 24 hours recall

Study setting

Online

Age group of participant

Adults

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=105159 (participants)

Eating ultra-processed foods associated with an increase in heart disease

Goal

Find the association between a diet high in ultra-processed foods with cardiovascular diseaseS.

Results

Results of the study were then divided into quarters. Those in the highest quartile of ultra-processed food consumption tended to be younger, current smokers, less educated, less family history of cardiovascular disease and have lower physical activity levels 1. They also had higher BMIs and calorie intake 1.

The average contribution of ultra-processed foods to the overall diet was 17.6% in men and 17.3% in women. The largest contribution of ultra-processed foods were sugary products (28%, ie- ice cream, pastries, sweetened dairy desserts), followed by ultra-processed fruit & vegetables (18%, ie- instant powder dehydrated vegetable soups, vegetable nuggets, fruit-based sweetened desserts) 1.

During the follow-up time of 5.2 years, there were 1,409 first time cardiovascular events (ie-heart attack, stroke). Intake of ultra-processed food was associated with a higher risk of overall cardiovascular disease (277 per 100,000 vs 242 per 100,000, p=0.02). These results remained significant even after adjustments for nutritional quality of the diet 1.

Authors

Patella J.

Journal

Natural Health Research Institute

DOI