Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Mixed-Method

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

United Kingdom

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

Four-day food record

Study setting

Database

Age group of participant

Children/4-10

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (children)

Sample size

n=1772 (participants)

Eating context and its association with ultra-processed food consumption by British children

Goal

Investigate the patterns of eating context and its association with ultra-processed food consumption by British children.

Results

Ultra-processed foods comprised 65.4% of the total daily energy intake. At lunch, higher ultra-processed food consumption was associated with the patterns “Eating with family while watching TV” (64.9% in the lowest tertile to 68.1% in the highest tertile) and “Eating away from home” (65.2%–67.7%, respectively), while the eating pattern “Eating at school with friends” was associated with lower ultra-processed food consumption (66.6%–64.7%, respectively). At dinner, higher ultra-processed food consumption was associated with the patterns “Eating with family while watching TV” (64.6%–67.1%, respectively) and “Eating alone in the bedroom” (63.9%–66.5%, respectively).

Authors

Onita BM, Azeredo CM, Jaime PC, Levy RB, Rauber F.

Journal

Appetite

DOI