Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Canada

Data

Secondary

Data Collected

One 24 hours recall

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Adults/25-64

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=8109 (participants)

Diet quality in relation to income, education, and food insecurity amoung canadian adults

Goal

Investigate the relationship between socioeconomic characteristic of Candian adults and diet quality.

Results

While few differences were identified based on income quintile, post-secondary education and food security benefitted Canadians’ intake of micronutrients, fibre, fruits/vegetables, percent of energy from ultra-processed foods and/or Healthy Eating Index scores. High income/education in women was also associated with higher diet quality in most indicators analyzed. However, sodium and saturated fat intakes did not differ by socioeconomic characteristics. Our results indicate that higher socioeconomic status, particularly in women, is associated with higher diet quality. Moving forward, nutrition policy should consider the relationships between socioeconomic status and diet quality to optimize interventions and reduce the likelihood of exacerbating the nutrition disparities observed.

Authors

La Mantia C.

Journal

University of Toronto

DOI