Data

Year of publication

2014

Type

Quantitative

Design

Longitudinal

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Brazil

Data

Primary

Data Collected

Two 24 hours recalls (per period)

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Childrens/2-4 and 7-8

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

Vulnerable (childrens)

Sample size

n= 345 (participants)

Consumption of ultra-processed food products and its effects on children’s lipid profiles: A Longitudinalstudy

Goal

Assess whether children’s consumption of processed and ultra-processed products at preschool age predicted an increase in lipid concentrationsfrom preschool to school age.

Results

The percentage of daily energy provided by pro-cessed and ultra-processed products was 42.6± 8.5 at preschool age and 49.2± 9.5 at schoolage, on average. In terms of energy intake, the main products consumed were breads, savourysnacks, cookies, candy and other sweets in both age groups. Ultra-processed product consump-tion at preschool age was a predictor of a higher increase in total cholesterol (_ = 0.430;P=0.046) and LDL cholesterol (_ = 0.369;P=0.047) from preschool to school age.Conclusion: Our data suggest that early ultra-processed product consumption played a role in altering lipoprotein profiles in children from a low-income community in Brazil. These results are important to understanding the role of food processing and the early dietary determinants of cardiovascular disease.

Authors

Rauber F, Campagnolo PDB, Hoffman DJ, Vitolo MR.

Journal

Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

DOI