Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Longitudinal

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

United Kingdom, Portugal, Ireland, Germany and France

Data

Primary

Data Collected

One food frequency

Study setting

Household

Age group of participant

Adults/55-74

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n=91891 (participants)

Association of ultra-processed food consumption with cardiovascular mortality in the US population: long-term results from a large prospective multicenter study

Goal

Examine the association of ultra-processed food consumption with cardiovascular mortality in a US population.

Results

After an average follow-up of 13.5 years (1236049.2 person-years), 5490 cardiovascular deaths were documented, including 3985 heart disease deaths and 1126 cerebrovascular deaths. In the fully adjusted model, participants in the highest vs. the lowest quintiles of ultra-processed food consumption had higher risks of death from cardiovascular disease (HRquintile 5 vs. 1, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.36–1.64) and heart disease (HRquintile 5 vs. 1, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.50–1.87) but not cerebrovascular disease (HRquintile 5 vs. 1, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.76–1.17). A nonlinear dose–response pattern was observed for overall cardiovascular and heart disease mortality (all Pnonlinearity<0.05), with a threshold effect observed at ultra-processed food consumption of 2.4 servings/day and 2.3 servings/day, respectively; below the thresholds, no significant associations were observed for these two outcomes. Subgroup analyses showed that the increased risks of mortality from ultra-processed foods were significantly higher in women than in men (all Pinteraction<0.05).

Authors

Zhong G, Gu H, Peng Y, Wang K, Wu Y, et al.

Journal

Research Square

DOI