Data

Year of publication

2020

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA, other (NutriScore)

Country studied

Spain

Data

Primary

Data Collected

Food samples

Study setting

Laboratory

Age group of participant

N/A

Participant sex

N/A

Target population

General

Sample size

n=53 (breakfast cereals)

Association between heat-induced chemical markers and ultra-processed foods: A case study on breakfast cereals

Goal

Investigate the link between the degree of processing as described by the international NOVA food classification system and the occurrence of heat-induced chemical markers in breakfast cereals.

Results

No statistically significant differences in acrylamide and HMF were found across the NutriScore groups. Sugar content was the only nutritional descriptor found to be significantly different between processed (11.6 g/100 g) and ultra-processed (23.1 g/100 g) breakfast cereal groups. Sugar content correlated with acrylamide (p < 0.001) and HMF (p < 0.0001). Acrylamide and HMF contents were not significantly higher in the NOVA-4 group when compared with the NOVA-3 group. However, trends towards higher acrylamide and HMF content are observed, amounting to a change of 75 µg/kg and 13.3 mg/kg in processed breakfast cereals, and 142 µg/kg and 32.1 mg/kg in ultra-processed breakfast cereals, respectively.

Authors

Morales FJ, Mesías M, Delgado-Andrade C.

Journal

Nutrients

DOI