Data

Year of publication

2018

Type

Quantitative

Design

Cross-sectional

Classification

NOVA

Country studied

Lebanon

Data

Primary

Data Collected

One food frequency

Study setting

Clinic

Age group of participant

Adults/18+

Participant sex

Mixed

Target population

General

Sample size

n= 302 (participants)

A minimally processed dietary pattern is associated with lower odds of metabolic syndrome among Lebanese adults

Goal

1) estimate the consumption of minimally processed, processed and ultra-processed foods in a sample of Lebanese adults; 2) explore patterns of intakes of these food groups; and 3) investigate the association of the derived patterns with cardiometabolic risk.

Results

Of total energy intake, 36,53 and 27,10 % were contributed by ultra-processed and minimally processed foods, respectively. Two dietary patterns were identified: the ‘ultra-processed’ and the ‘minimally processed/processed’. The ‘ultra-processed’ consisted mainly of fast foods, snacks, meat, nuts, sweets and liquor, while the ‘minimally processed/processed’ consisted mostly of fruits, vegetables, legumes, breads, cheeses, sugar and fats. Participants in the highest quartile of the ‘minimally processed/processed’ pattern had significantly lower odds for metabolic syndrome (OR=0·18, 95 % CI 0·04, 0·77), hyperglycaemia (OR=0·25, 95 % CI 0·07, 0·98) and low HDL cholesterol (OR=0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·60). Conclusion : The study findings may be used for the development of evidence-based interventions aimed at encouraging the consumption of minimally processed foods.

Authors

Nasreddine L, Tamim H, Itani L, et al.

Journal

Public Health Nutr

DOI